Eggs in Hell! (from my YouTube channel)

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Welcome to Italian Healthy Fast Food! This classic dish, also known as Eggs in Purgatory, epitomizes Italian, simple home-cooking at its best. Traditionally it is made with leftover sugo (tomato sauce, the type you dress your pasta with), simply reheated with a little water. The eggs are cracked straight into the sauce and poached for a few minutes, until set to your liking. And if you don’t have leftover sauce, it is very easy to make your own, as you can see in my new video recipe. Why have the eggs gone from Purgatory to Hell? The addition of a LOT of chillie! Suit your taste, add as much or as little as you can handle.

Watch the video for more tips and please, make sure you subscribe to get all my tips and recipes!

Ciao Ciao! XX

EGGS IN HELL VIDEO

INGREDIENTS Serves 4

2-3 tablespoon of extra-virgin olive oil

1 spring onion, thinly sliced 1-2 hot chillies, thinly sliced

1 small rib of celery, finely chopped 1 tablespoon of finely chopped

1-2 tablespoons parsley stalks, finely chopped

1 tin of chopped tomatoes

1/4 cup of water

salt and pepper for seasoning

4 eggs

baby celery leaves to sprinkle on top

METHOD

1. Heat the oil in a medium sized frying pan, add spring onion, chillies, celery, chopped parsley stalks and cook together for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant. Add tinned tomatoes and water, bring to a simmer, then turn the heat to low and cook for 10 minutes, lid on. Season for salt and adjust to your liking.

2. Take off the lid, create 4 indents in the sauce to accommodate the eggs, Crack the eggs, one at a time, and gently place them in the indents in the sauce. Season with salt and pepper. Cook on low heat for 5-6 minutes or until the whites are cooked through and the yolk is cooked to your liking.

3. Serve straight from the pan, with baby celery leaves, extra chillies (if liked) and chopped parsley.

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Risotto with Porcini Mushroom

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Richard and I spent the best part of yesterday afternoon perched up on a builders plank, unsafely plonked onto our window sill and the top of the staircase, in the attempt to hang seven, beautiful, paintings made by Richard himself over the course of the last two weeks. A gargantuan task, if you add the demands of a 4 year-old on a sunny Saturday afternoon and those of a 12 month-old, desperately wanting adult attention! After we hung the seventh frame, we had just about 3 minutes to contemplate and admire the fruits of such hard labour and marvel at the fact that no one got injured in the process, when the paintings started to drop from the wall one after the other…I could think of only one solution to the problem: comfort food! And a glass of wine…Risotto sprang to mind, as I had just made a rich and flavorful vegetable stock. If you have read my other posts on risotto you know by now that the only ingredient that will determine the taste of your finished dish is the quality of your stock. Home-made always wins. Your risotto will only taste as good as your stock. You do the maths!

INGREDIENTS, serves 4

2 handfuls of dried porcini , soaked in warm water for 30 minutes. (They need to be soft and rehydrated before you can use them)

1 leek, well washed and sliced thinly

1-2 springs of thyme

3 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon of butter+ 1 more just before serving

350 gr (2 cups) of Carnaroli or Arborio rice

1/2 cup of dry white wine

2 lt of stock, brought up to a gentle simmer

1/2 cup of freshly grated Parmigiano

Parsley leaves

Salt and pepper to taste

HOW TO

1. Stir fry  the leek gently with oil and butter, add the thyme springs, 1 couple of tablespoons of water and  pinch of salt. Cover with a lid and stew for 5 minutes over low heat to soften the leeks.

2. Add therice and toast with the leeks until translucent. Be mindful to stir your rice well.

3. Add the white wine and allow for the alcohol to evaporate, stirring gently. Pour yourself some wine, while you are at it…

4. Turn the heat down, add your softened mushroom and start adding the stock a ladleful at a time, while stirring gently. For added mushroom flavor, add the porcini soaking liquid to your stock. Taste for salt and adjust accordingly. Keep adding stock until the rice is cooked, this will take around 18 minutes.

5. Turn off the heat and add a generous dusting of parmigiano, a tablespoon of  butter and one ladeful of stock. Stir vigorously to release the starch and create the classic all’onda* texture. Cover with a lid and let it rest for a few minutes to  create the perfect mantecatura, creaminess

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Serve it with freshly ground black pepper and parsley leaves.

* The way of the waves

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Roasted-Beetroot Risotto

My very first advise to you when making a risotto is to not even think about it unless you have a great stock to cook it with. Your risotto will only taste as good as your broth, so if you use those powdery mixes or even worse, those salty cubes full of chemicals, that is the flavour you will impart to your rice.
Since risotto is a bit labour intensive, it really not worth it unless you are going to show it a bit of love. Recently, I poached a chicken with garlic, tarragon onion and carrot with the intent of eating the meat with steamed potatoes and of using the stock for a risotto. It’s winter here in Australia and it had been raining for days in Sydney and last Sunday I felt like I needed to colour the day a vivid red.

INGREDIENTS, serves 4

3 beetroot bulbs

1 red onion , diced

3 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil

350 gr (2 cups) of Arborio or Carnaroli rice

1/2 cup of dry white wine

2 lt of good stock, brought tot a gentle simmer

1 tablespoon of butter

1/2 cup of freshly grated Parmigiano

Salt and pepper to taste

goat cheese

HOW TO

1. Cover the beetroots in foil and roasted them in a hot oven for about 1 hour. Peel them and puree them in a food processor  with a little salt and extra-virgin. Set aside.

2. Stir fry gently the diced onion in olive oil until tender. Add your Carnaroli rice and toast with the onion until translucent. Be mindful to stir your rice well.

3. Add a glass of dry white wine and allow for the alcohol to evaporate, stirring occasionally. Turn the heat down and start adding the stock a ladleful at a time, while stirring gently.

4. Keep adding stock until the rice is cooked, this will take around 18 minutes.

5. Turn off the heat and add the beetroot puree, a generous dusting of parmigiano and a little butter. Stir vigorously to release the starch and create the all’onda* texture. Cover with a lid and let it rest for a few minutes to create the perfect mantecatura, creaminess.

The vibrant red put us in a festive mood and we felt urged to open a Prosecco to go with the risotto.

And after that, a long siesta

* All’onda means ” the way of the waves”

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